Buck's Blog

The Stream-of-Conciousness Journal of a Wargamer
  • .: Welcome to my blog :.

    I'm John R. "Buck" Surdu. I have two Web pages that contain relatively static information about my professional life (including papers I've written) and my hobby life (including information about rules I've written and my wargaming projects). This blog is where I plan to post personal tidbits, like vacation pictures, wargaming projects, etc. Enjoy!
  • New Combat Patrol(TM) Supplement: Skirmish Campaigns

    Posted By on April 26, 2016

    At the request of a Combat Patrol(TM) gamer, I just posted a short supplement to the rules’ Web page that provides the Rosetta Stone to convert the generic Skirmish Campaigns ratings to the attributes for figures in Combat Patrol(TM).  Enjoy!

    What I Did This Weekend

    Posted By on April 24, 2016

    Don providing the rules overview of Muskets and Tomahawks

    Don providing the rules overview of Muskets and Tomahawks

    This was a big gaming / hobby weekend.  Tom is at West Point, and my wife was visiting my daughter at her school for the weekend, so I was a geographic bachelor.  The weekend began on Friday with our normal HAWKs meeting.  This week we only ran one, large game, instead of the more typical two six-player games.  We will be running a large Muskets and Tomahawks game at the HARCON gaming day at Harford Community College next weekend.  Friday we set up the table and made sure that all the HAWKs were reasonably proficient with the rules.

    A long shot early in the Muskets and Tomahawks game -- I'm not sure what was happening that was eliciting that facial expression from Geoff

    A long shot early in the Muskets and Tomahawks game -- I'm not sure what was happening that was eliciting that facial expression from Geoff

    Most of us had forgotten how slowly unit move in Muskets and Tomahawks, so the play test was good.  We’ll adjust where the players enter so that they get into the action more quickly.  This will almost be a demonstration game.  The idea is that the HAWKs will be playing and whenever a passer by shows interest, we can provide and unit and get him/her right into the action.

    On my flank, Eric and I met Kurt and Kevin -- and the results were quite bloody

    On my flank, Eric and I met Kurt and Kevin -- and the results were quite bloody

    I had THREE events scheduled for Saturday.  The first event took place in the morning.  Greg and Chris played a Combat Patrol (TM): WWII game while I taped it.  The idea was to create a video battle report, including some rules explanation.

    Greg (right) and me during our taping of the video battle report of a Combat Patrol(TM): World War II game

    Greg (right) and me during our taping of the video battle report of a Combat Patrol(TM): World War II game

    It will likely take me all week in the hotel on business travel this week to edit all the segments into something that isn’t too boring and cuts out some of the mistakes.

    Duncan (left) and Chris getting ready to start the Combat Patrol (TM): Napoleonic game

    Duncan (left) and Chris getting ready to start the Combat Patrol (TM): Napoleonic game

    The second hobby event on Saturday was another play test of Duncan’s Napoleonic supplement for Combat Patrol (TM).  I posted some notes from a play test a couple of weeks ago.  Duncan made a number of changes and tweaks between the two games.  It is working well, but we want to get a few more games under out belt before thinking about going public with it.

    Don's infantry approaches one of the buildings at the crossroads while the townspeople watch

    Don's infantry approaches one of the buildings at the crossroads while the townspeople watch

    Don's men facing off against Chris' forces

    Don's men facing off against Chris' forces

    We used the same village at the crossroads terrain for the Napoleonic game that we used for the WWII video, but we pushed the woods more toward the edges of the table.

    My cavalry (bottom and right) moving forward to engage Duncan's cavalry

    My cavalry (bottom and right) moving forward to engage Duncan's cavalry

    We are getting much closer on the cavalry rules.  It is working fine, but we need to think a little more about how to describe what we are doing so that it will be clear and unambiguous to others.  We are very happy with the swirling, chaotic nature of cavalry engagements.

    Another swirling cavalry melee

    Another swirling cavalry melee

    Again we used Mexicans as surrogates to make sure we were testing the rules for lancers.  After this engagement, elements of four cavalry units were badly scattered and attrited.

    The third event on Saturday was a brainstorming session with Chris and Don about ideas for a science fiction version of Look, Sarge, No Charts.  It was a good conversation, and I have a lot of food for thought.  My next step will be to design a candidate base label to see if all the ideas we discussed are representable in the game.

    On Sunday, still being a geographic bachelor, I spent the day on hobby activities again.  Last weekend, when I air brushed the German vehicles I showed in last weekends blog entry, I also airbrushed a number of science fiction vehicles I plan to use in 28mm science fiction games with Combat Patrol (TM).  One set of vehicles were plastic, Russian-made kits.  These come with a number of different weapons.  I chose to assemble them as two pairs of vehicles.  I think they turned out nicely.  These will be light tanks with three-man crews.

    Russian-made science fiction vehicle kits airbrushed and painted to be light tanks in my upcoming 28mm Combat Patrol(TM): Science Fiction games

    Russian-made science fiction vehicle kits airbrushed and painted to be light tanks in my upcoming 28mm Combat Patrol(TM): Science Fiction games

    I completed painting these four armored personnel carries from Pig Iron.  I ordered these right after they announced they were going out of business.

    Pig Iron armored personnel carriers

    Pig Iron armored personnel carriers

    All of the Pig Iron vehicles have the same body, and you can make them armored personnel carries or add turrets to make them a support vehicle or an anti-tank vehicle.  I am happy with the way they turned out.  I assembled mine so that I can switch back and forth between armored personnel carries and the support vehicles.

    Two of the APCs converted to an infantry support vehicle and an anti-tank vehicle by removing the APC tops and replacing them with turrets

    Two of the APCs converted to an infantry support vehicle and an anti-tank vehicle by removing the APC tops and replacing them with turrets

    I acquired a couple handfuls of bark chips from Duncan, because I have been wanting to make more rocky outcroppings for my games.  I use the same sage felt for most of my games, and I even cover my hills with the same sage felt.  I wanted these rocky outcroppings to match as well. I had a few scraps of the sage felt from a hill-making project, so I cut them into circles and glued them to some old CDs.

    Gluing circles of sage felt to old AOL Online disks

    Gluing circles of sage felt to old AOL Online disks

    I sprayed the bark chips with black and dry brushed them with a dark gray.  Then I hot glued the bark pieces to the felt-covered CDs.  Finally I dry brushed them again with a very light gray.

    Some of the finished rock formations

    Some of the finished rock formations

    In this picture the felt circles don’t appear to match the ground cloth underneath.  Part of the issue is that the ground cloth has been sprayed with a few colors of paint to give it more texture. The other part of the issue is that the ground cloth has had a lot more use — and the nap has been roughed up — so they felt circles and the ground cloth reflect light a little differently.  Still, I think they blend better than something that has been flocked or textured and painted.

    Finally, I got a bunch of 1:50 vehicles second had at Cold Wars, so I sprayed them green (most were Russian and two US M-10 tank destroyers) and painted the wheels and tracks.

    So it was a productive weekend.

     

     

    A Day with the Air Brush

    Posted By on April 18, 2016

    German infantry in front of three Ban Dai Hanomags

    German infantry in front of three Ban Dai Hanomags

    In 2009 a buddy gave me an airbrush, and then I deployed to Iraq, moved twice, retired, and changed jobs.  Today was the first time I had a chance to play with it.  About a year ago, my dad replaced his compressor and gave me the old one.  Last time I used an airbrush was probably 35 years ago with Humbrol oil-based paint.  There was a bit of a learning curve with getting the consistency right with acrylics and also learning how to operate this model air brush.  The results are passable.  These are all 1:48 kits, and I will use them with my 28mm Combat Patrol(TM) games.

    German infantry in front of a Fuman Hetzer

    German infantry in front of a Fuman Hetzer

    Italieri 3-ton 4x2 cargo truck

    Italieri 3-ton 4x2 cargo truck

    Fuman Sherman 76mm

    Fuman Sherman 76mm

    The Sherman and Hetzer kits came with stick on “decals,” but they had a hunter green background.  I tried cutting the stars out of the background, but the results were pretty lousy.  Instead, I hand painted the stars, which is slightly less lousy.

    Rear of Fuman Sherman 76mm

    Rear of Fuman Sherman 76mm

    These aren’t going to win any contests, but they are good enough for gaming.  This was a fun project, and I enjoyed getting to play with an airbrush again.  I also air brushed a bunch of science fiction vehicles for 28mm Combat Patrol(TM): Science Fiction, but I haven’t done the detail work on them yet, so those pictures will wait for another day.

    First Battalion of 10mm Science Fiction Infantry

    Posted By on April 17, 2016

    Newly completed infantry battalion with four "line" companies and a heavy weapons company

    Newly completed infantry battalion with four "line" companies and a heavy weapons company

    After some yard work and running a few errands, I completed my first battalion of 10mm infantry for Look, Sarge, No Charts: Near Future and Science Fiction.  This battalion was made of Dropzone Commander infantry of different types.  For this battalion I was considering either three companies of four platoons or four companies of three platoons.  I decided on the latter and added a heavy weapons company.

    Recon platoon for the infantry battalion that is a battalion-level asset

    Recon platoon for the infantry battalion that is a battalion-level asset

    The battalion also has a light reconnaissance platoon at the battalion level not shown in the previous picture.  These, I think , were from a clicky base game, and I found them in the Flea Market at Cold Wars last March.

    This battalion is painted in khaki with olive helmets.  As with the tank battalions, each infantry battalion will have a slightly different paint scheme to make it easier for players to distinguish them on the tabletop.

    Four independent companies

    Four independent companies

    In addition to the full infantry battalion, I also painted some independent companies that will be assigned to battalions from division or brigade.  Note that these are in a different paint scheme from the infantry battalion.  The independent companies are in a basic olive green scheme with slightly different colored helmets.

    Heavy assault company with heavily armored infantry

    Heavy assault company with heavily armored infantry

    This is a very heavy assault company.  I see brigade attaching this company to a battalion that must force a breach in enemy lines or assault an urban area.  These guys will be somewhat slow, but have a lot of firepower and be difficult to kill.

    Heavy weapons company with some sort of rocket launchers and some sort of heavy gun

    Heavy weapons company with some sort of rocket launchers and some sort of heavy gun

    This is some sort of heavy weapons company.  I haven’t decided what these weapons will be just yet.  The rocket battery in the back will likely act as artillery, and I am thinking of the heavy cannon in the front being some sort of heavy anti-tank weapon, but it might end up as some sort of artillery as well.  Who knows?

    Heavy infantry company (there are two of these) with power armor

    Heavy infantry company (there are two of these) with power armor

    I made two companies of these heavy infantry.  They would be attached to a battalion that is the main effort to bolster their combat power.

    Recon platoons that are intended to be assigned to battalions to augment their organic reconnaissance capabilities

    Recon platoons that are intended to be assigned to battalions to augment their organic reconnaissance capabilities

    These will either be a set of recon platoons that can be assigned in penny packets to battalions that need them or deployed as a screening force on the flanks of the main effort.  The rocket launchers give them some ability to hold off enemy armor, while the chain guns are terrific against enemy infantry.

    Today I am shifting gears away from 10mm.  The weather is nice, so I am going to break out the airbrush in the back yard.  I have five German 1:48 vehicles for Combat Patrol (a Hetzer, three halftracks, and a truck) that have been base coated in desert yellow but now need the 1944 brown and green camouflage air brushed on them.  It has been quite a while since I have used an airbrush, and in the past I have done it with Humbrol oils, so I am somewhat apprehensive about getting the consistency of acrylics correct for this project.  I hope that they will look good enough to post some pictures this evening.   I will be using this as my pattern.

    Sci-Fi Shipping Containers

    Posted By on April 14, 2016

    Finished sci-fi shipping container next to a Woodbine 28mm figure

    Finished sci-fi shipping container next to a Woodbine 28mm figure

    I recently ended up with a stack of unwanted hexagonal bases from the Reaper CAV Kickstarter.  Why all the tanks I ordered came with all these bases, I don’t know, but they did.  I was trying to figure out what to do with them.  As I was holding a couple together contemplating their potential, I hit upon this idea

    A blister pack of hexagonal bases

    A blister pack of hexagonal bases

    Six of these bases come in a blister pack from Reaper.  They are textured on the top and have some support structures on the underside.

    Bases glued together and primed black

    Bases glued together and primed black

    So, I glued six of them together with E-6000, sprayed them black, and then dry brushed them with a couple shades of gray and white.  I also printed some labels in alien symbols to mark the boxes.  I think the effect is pretty good, and they will be great in the cargo hold of the space ship I plan to build for 28mm science fiction Combat Patrol games.

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    Fourth Reaper CAV Armored Battalion

    Posted By on April 10, 2016

    The 4th CAV battalion

    The 4th CAV battalion

    Even with the Combat Patrol(TM) play test day yesterday, I managed to complete my 4th Reaper CAV tank battalion, this time heavy tanks.  From previous posts, you know that I am painting each battalion in different camouflage schemes to make them easier to distinguish on the gaming table.  The first three were in a modern, realistic camouflage pattern.  I decided to be a little more outlandish with this battalion.

    Another view

    Another view

    Of course, this could be a very realistic camouflage scheme on a different planet.

    A close up of one of the command vehicles

    A close up of one of the command vehicles

    After completing this battalion, I felt like I should make the battalion HQ more distinguishable.  If you look at the top image, you see that the company and battalion HQ bases each consist of a single vehicle on the same sized base.  I decided the easier way to distinguish the battalion HQ bases was to put a small guidon on the battalion HQ vehicle.

    Adding flags to denote the battalion HQ from the company HQs

    Adding flags to denote the battalion HQ from the company HQs

    The flags are removable to make the bases easier to store.

    Now, I need to get started on all the infantry while I await the few missing vehicles from the CAV Kickstarter to arrive…

    Play Test of Two Combat Patrol(TM) Supplements

    Posted By on April 10, 2016

    Getting ready to play test Combat Patrol(TM): Napoleonic Wars

    Getting ready to play test Combat Patrol(TM): Napoleonic Wars

    A number of people have agreed to develop supplements for Combat Patrol(TM).  Supplements in active development are Napoleonic Wars, The Falklands, several British colonial periods, and modern Afghanistan and Iraq.  Several of the supplements have elements common to each other.  For instance, several of these periods require rules for close formations and cavalry.  To help ensure that these supplements are consistent with each other and the intent of the base rules, I hosted a play test day in my gaming room.  We had initially hoped to get in three games, but ended up only running two.

    Laying out the forces for the Napoleonic game

    Laying out the forces for the Napoleonic game

    Everyone converged on the “war room” at 0900, but we spent the better part of two hours just talking about Duncan’s Napoleonic supplement, how to deal with closed order troops, cavalry, charging, etc.  It was a good session and set the stage for a successful play test.

    Zeb and Chris put their troops into their initial deployments

    Zeb and Chris place their troops into their initial deployments

    I have found that a play test event like this needs to be a small group of the right folks who are okay with changing the rules on the fly, can offer suggestions that remain in keeping with the tone and intent of the base rules, understand the desire for simplicity and consistency, etc.  In this case I only invited those folks who were interested in writing a Combat Patrol(TM) supplement.  To me it was important that I got everyone on the same sheet of music.

    Our intent with this supplement — and all of them really — is to change as little as possible from the base WWII rules.  There needs to be a compelling reason to make a change or addition for period feel.  Otherwise, we want to make sure that supplements are as consistent with the base rules and with each other as possible.

    Our intent was to test as many aspects of Duncan’s supplement as possible.  One of the reasons to select a play test group carefully, is that you also need folks who won’t get too wrapped around the axel about trying to win the game or scenario anachronisms.  In the case of the photo (above), we used Mexican lancers as part of the British force, because those are the only lancers Duncan had in 28mm, and we wanted to test the lancer modifiers to the basic melee rules.

    My "British" cavalry advances toward the French

    My "British" cavalry advances toward the French

    In order to test a wide swath of the rules, we had lancers, regular infantry, Rifles, hussars, etc.  The scenario involved a small British detachment defending the house at the top of the picture with the rest of the British riding to their rescue as the French try to seize it.

    A confused affair in the woods

    A confused affair in the woods

    In advance of Chris’ farmhouse defenders, Chris had deployed a section of infantry in open order in the woods to slow down Zeb’s French.  Zeb advanced slowly through the woods in formed lines, while Chris spread out in open order.  Eventually Chris was driven from the woods.  One of his soldiers was left behind accidentally as most of the section fled the woods and ran toward the farm yard.  Once the “rear guard” was out of command radius, be became “pinned,” and Chris couldn’t extract him, but the figure, who we dubbed “Crazy Jenkins” held of several of Zeb’s attacks for several turns, slowing the French advance.

    Chris' section defends the farm yard while my cavalry advances to the rescue

    Chris' section defends the farm yard while my cavalry advances to the rescue.

    As a major focus of this play test session was to test the cavalry rules, Zeb and I conspired to create a cavalry battle in the center of the table.  Unfortunately as my lancers advanced and deployed, Zeb activated first and charged my lancers with his hussars.  As luck would have it, he was able to gain impetus and I was caught stationary.  The results were ugly for me.

    Duncan’s intent was for these melees to become confused fur balls that would take a turn to two to resolve.  Our thinking is that much of the confusion of a melee is generally abstracted away at higher levels of abstraction, but we want this to be explicit in Combat Patrol(TM): Napoleonic Wars.  You can see elements to three cavalry units in this picture:  Zeb’s French hussars are in the center and left, my lancers are in the center, and my hussars are toward the bottom.

    As the cavalry melee continues, Greg's infantry advances

    As the cavalry melee continues, Greg's infantry advances

    Slowly my numerical advantage over Zeb begin to tell, and he collected a lot of morale markers (the pile of green chips).  His cavalry scattered, and I moved to reorganize my cavalry and work around the exposed flank of the French infantry.

    I attacked this French infantry unit on the flank and rear, but the French passed their Reaction check and were allowed to face their second rank to the rear.  The results were ugly for my cavalry.  While we still need to tinker with the modifiers to melee a bit, in general, the new rules for close order vs. open order, cavalry in melee, and cavalry vs. infantry seem to work well.  We are still thinking about the advantages and disadvantages of being in close order.

    Chris got most of his forces from the woods back to the farm yard, but Zeb was hot on his heels, and my cavalry was in no condition to assist Chris.

    Chris got most of his forces from the woods back to the farm yard, but Zeb was hot on his heels, and my cavalry was in no condition to assist Chris.

    Duncan has come up with a mechanic that I like for cavalry.  There is no charge bonus, per se.  Cavalry must spend the last four inches of its move going straight ahead in order to receive an impetus bonus in the melee.  Remember:  this is a skirmish game, not a tactical game.  In my “charge” around flank of Duncan’s infantry, I did not have impetus, which hurt me in the subsequent melee.  I think it worked pretty well.

    I had smashed my cavalry against Zeb’s cavalry and Duncan’s infantry, and Duncan and Zeb still had two untouched sections of infantry.  Chris was is sad shape in the farm yard with Zeb’s battered by still good infantry closing on him.  At this point, we had accomplished our play test goals and had a clear winner, so we called the game and set up our second play test.

    The second game was a play test of Greg’s Falklands supplement.  After we cleaned up I realized that I didn’t take any pictures.  Greg has ordered a platoon each of British and Argentinians for the Falklands, but for this play test we used his UNIT troopers from his Dr. Who games for British and my WWII US for Argentinians.  The terrain was mostly barren and rocky.  We used Top Malo as the play test scenario.  As the Falklands war is much more like WWII than the Napoleonic Wars are, there were fewer optional rules to test.  We tested the new weapons for the Falklands, and we tested rules for night fighting.  According to Greg’s research the Argentinians had better night vision than the British, but the British employed them better.  Greg’s rules seemed to reflect this well.  By this time, Zeb had had to leave, so we had the four member of our club with the most notoriously cold dice facing each other in the dark.  In the real battle the British set the Top Malo house afire with M72 LAWs, but Chris and I got “out of ammunition” results with most of our sections when we tried to use our LAWs, meaning that we ran out of them.  With the Argentinians having better night vision, and our LAWs depleted, we had no choice but to advance to close range across largely open ground.  The results were predictable.  Greg and Duncan soundly defeated us; although, Chris made excellent use of his M203 grenade launchers to soften them up.  Sorry I don’t have any pictures to show, but with all the surrogates for figures and terrain, it wouldn’t have looked very Falklands-like to purists.

    It was a successful day.  I think we’ll have the Napoleonic supplement ready to share with a slightly wider group of play testers in a few weeks.  Greg and I need to think a little more about night fighting, but the basic concept we employed seemed to be okay.  I hope to schedule another play test day to focus on Iraq and Afghanistan and perhaps another Falklands or Napoleonic test.  We had hoped to have The Falklands done before Salute, but the real world has gotten in the way.

    This Weekend’s Projects

    Posted By on April 3, 2016

    This weekend, I knocked out a few odds and ends.  This is the Reaper Bones I Kickstarter clockwork dragon.  Honesty, this one piece was the reason I bought into Bones I in the first place.  I finally got around to priming and painting this piece over the weekend.  I’m pretty happy with how it turned out, even though the feet didn’t really stand flat, so I had to build up the base somewhat.

    I also painted a third battalion of armored vehicles from the Reaper CAV Kickstarter, this time with a slightly lighter — almost jungle colored camouflage pattern.  This is a light anti-tank battalion.  I like the turretless design.  The Army was working on a replacement for the M-551 Sheridan, called the Armored Gun System, that had a similar turretless design.

    The anti-tank gun battalion

    The anti-tank gun battalion

    A closer look at the camouflage pattern

    A closer look at the camouflage pattern

    A base that will represent the overall army commander.  I like the big radar / communications array.

    A base that will represent the overall army commander. I like the big radar / communications array.

    I painted this Reaper Bones II Kraken some months ago, but one of our gamers was asking about it this weekend, so I decided to post a couple of pictures.

    Completed Second Battalion of CAV Vehicles

    Posted By on April 1, 2016

    A yellow platoon

    A yellow platoon

    I completed the second battalion of CAV vehicles, this time a battalion of light tanks.  I tried a lighter camouflage scheme on this battalion.  As I mentioned in my previous post, my intent is that each battalion will have a different camouflage pattern to make it easier for players to keep their battalions separated on the table.

    Another view

    Another view

    The battalion command post and some sort of battalion missile asset

    The battalion command post and some sort of battalion missile asset

    A view of the white company

    A view of a portion of the white company

    The "Triangle Battalion" deployed

    The "Triangle Battalion" deployed

    Completed First Battalion of Reaper CAV Vehicles

    Posted By on March 30, 2016

    A close up of a heavy tank platoon

    A close up of a heavy tank platoon

    A few weeks ago I received my box of Reaper CAV figures in the Bones material from the Kickstarter.  I really like the look of the vehicles, as they have a near future vibe that I find plausible.  I didn’t purchase any of the stompy robots, because I think they would be silly, impractical, and expensive on a real battlefield.  Last night while watching a movie with my wife, I finished the first battalion.  These look to me like M-1 tanks with some kind of rocket launcher on the top.

    A battalion of Reaper CAV heavy tanks

    A battalion of Reaper CAV heavy tanks

    This signals the imminent start of development on the near future and science fiction version of Look, Sarge, No Charts.  Each base represents a platoon, so in the picture above, the heavy tank battalion has three companies of three platoons.  The single bases represent company and battalion HQ.  You can see that I have left space on the back of the bases for the characteristic Look, Sarge, No Chart data labels.

    I sprayed the vehicles with Krylon camouflage paint that is supposed to bond to plastic.  I didn’t find a specific camo and Fusion product, but these camo paints are supposed to work on plastic.  These paints did not result in the common tackiness that many experience with the Bones material.  Though they dried with a nice, flat finish, they felt a little damp, not tacky per se, but damp.   They almost felt like suede.  After painting on the camo pattern and a few other details, I overrated them with Army Painter matte finish.  If find the large cans of Army Painter matte finish convenience, but as you can see in these pictures, it is not as matte as the Dull Cote matte finish.  Anyway, after spraying them with the Army Painter matte finish the damp feel is completely gone.  I think I may hit them with a light coat of Dull Cote to dull them down.

    A command vehicle

    A command vehicle

    I don’t know if we’ll try to build our own back story and fluff, so there really is no guidance yet on organization, sides, or painting schemes.  At this point, I have two partially completed battalions of vehicles that I kit bashed from various sources.  I am painting them in straight olive drab.  The Reaper units I plan to paint in different camouflage schemes.  This battalion got a 1980′s US woodland paint scheme and the Desert Storm “V.”  I’ll be doing more fanciful painting themes on the next battalions.  While not 100% realistic, it is sometimes true that different units in the same Army have different painting schemes because they are habitually associated with a specific geographic area or terrain.  In Desert Storm, many of the deployed units had olive paint schemes, because they had been earmarked for deployment to Europe.  Anyway, the different camo schemes will help players keep their units separated on the tabletop.

    For the near future, my focus will remain on Combat Patrol(TM), but I will begin development of Look, Sarge, No Charts for the near future and science fiction genre.  Between turns, there will be a cyber phase in which players use their cyber forces to get into the enemy’s command and control networks.  This will result in the winning side of a cyber phase drawing some number cyber action cards that can be used during a turn to impact enemy spotting attempts, activations, and other actions.